HISTORY

The people needed MORE THAN BREAD

 
 
 

More Than Bread has been in existence since 2008. The idea for this ministry was conceived by the Executive Director Willio Destin, while attending a chapel service in 2004. A missionary from Brazil shared his testimony concerning his post-seminary ministry training in South Africa. He shared stories concerning his struggles with the country’s language and culture. 

As the missionary shared his testimony, it struck a chord in Willio. Before moving to Boston, Massachusetts in 1990 Willio spent the first nine years of his life in Haiti. He also speaks the language (Haitian Kreyol) fluently and had knowledge of the culture. Thus, after hearing this missionary’s testimony, he decided to launch a ministry in his native land. 

In 2006, Willio traveled to Haiti with a team of friends, spiritual mentors, and pastors to explore ministry opportunities. Since the capital (Port-Au-Prince) has an abundance of gospel ministries, it was decided to venture out into the country-side in his native village of Grand Goave.

While meeting with a group of Haitian pastors in the village and asked them what they thought was the greatest need in the Christian community of their village. Their response was unanimous. The churches needed trained pastors.

The seminary in the capital was too far to attend and the pre-seminary requirements were too advanced. Thus, the vision was clear. While living in the poorest country in the western hemisphere, the pastors did not ask for food, clothing, hospitals etc., they instead asked for the word of God. It was apparent to  that the people needed MORE THAN BREAD. 

In 2007, myself and a group of alumni from The Master’s Seminary, returned to Haiti and organized a pastoral conference. The goal was to choose 2-3 men and sponsor them for pastoral training at the theological seminary in Port-Au-Prince. Facon Maceus, and Enock Saint-Aime were selected as professors.  Along with Pastor Willio, they teach all of the classes at the Institute.

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